Contact Sheet — Volume 10

Contact Sheet is an irregular column of selected photographs and portraits from Residents of Second Life. Images used in this article are used under permission of the owners via their participation in the Creative Commons license; otherwise, all rights are reserved. Click on the links as necessary to go to the required blog, Flickr or Snapzilla page. Please go to these artists’ pages in any case to leave comments, as well as here, if you have an account on the appropriate service.

Suggestions are appreciated; please send descriptions and links to me by in-world IM, notecard, or E-mail to harper.ganesvoort@gmail.com, or leave a comment below.

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I’d hoped that Contact Sheet would become a regular thing, and it apparently has; I’m up to my tenth column! Interest in the piece is usually good, at least judging by my blog statistics, so there’s no reason at all to not keep this column rolling at least once a month ’till the Crack of Doom — or at least until I can’t find Second Life photos that tickle my fancy (grin).

So, this month, I’m focusing on a rarity (at least to me) in Second Life: the men! For some reason, I seem to have acquired far more female (or supposedly female!) Flickr contacts than men, and I’d like to revise the imbalance of the sexes here. But Connie Arida (a.k.a. Connie Sec) gave me a list of good male photographers a few columns ago in her comment. So let’s see what the beefcake side of the equation has to offer….

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Sextan Shepherd is first up; and yes, he’s most easy on the eyes to look at (grin). But get past that, and simply look at the positioning Sextan pulled off in composing Rider on the Storm, a self-portrait. That one column of light falling on the black-clad figure against a stormy background is the single note of grace (not grace note) in an image of dangerous romance.

For a less provocative piece, but no less beautiful, look here at The Ring of Anexia. This does not appear to have been taken inside Second Life, but I’m not sure; it could be a composite. But for sheer celestial beauty, it’s not bad at all!

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Not all of Stephen Venkman’s work is to my taste — though not for the reasons apparently weighing in the decision by Linden Lab that got him knocked out of exhibiting at this year’s SL5B. I haven’t even seen those pieces in question, and I have no position on the subject at this late date. (Read here for more on this, from the avatars’ side. I’d encourage getting more about the question from any announcements put up back when by the Lindens, and then make your own judgment.) Getting beyond that, Stephen’s also done some work that I do enjoy….

For instance, I can’t make up my mind whether this is a house or a hidden battle station. But would you like to run in to this while flying Within the Clouds?

Or this piece, absolutely intense in its ferocity. I can’t make out yet what’s flying out of the avatar besides black lightning in expels; but it’s probably a good thing that he’s getting rid of it. He has hopefully lost all the negativeness locked within himself by this single act….

Stephen is also capable of a quieter beauty, though, and even humor. For instance, he took It’s in our DNA with some friends one day; it’s not quite a double helix, but it sure gets the point across. (Don’t ask me what the note on the shot is all about, unless one of the participants was getting ready to hurl [grin].)

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Klipang Torok has been mostly a portraitist, at least on his Flickr stream. His work has been very very good, and I encourage a pass through all his pages, and dropping lots of comments there. Here’s a sampling of just some of it. (I went heavy here, but Klipang allows Creative Commons, and I’m taking advantage.)

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And, as the kids are nagging me for the computer, that’s all for now.  I have some more names in the list, as well as a pileup of more of my favorites, so I may do another column in the very near future.  Until then,

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